Welcome!

My name is Will Duchon. I live in Stratford, CT.


In 2003 I encountered Mr. Shane Watson, who is currently serving a 25 year to life sentence for second-degree murder. After careful review of the case transcripts, police reports, trial transcripts and other documentation, it became clear to me that Shane is not guilty of this crime. His case is an example of flawed "eyewitness" testimony, an incredibly flimsy prosecution, and essentially a travesty of justice. Shane is 50 years old, and has been in prison since 1993.

I followed up my suspicions about the case with Dr. Jennifer Dysart, currently a professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in NYC. Her SUMMARY confirmed my suspicions.



Along with some dedicated friends from Pleasantville Presbyterian Church in Pleasantville, NY, Monroe Congregational Church in Monroe, CT, the fine attorney Robert Boyle of New York City, and our dedicated investigator Doug Walters of Chicago, I am seeking to have Shane's conviction overturned so that ultimately, he will be free to enjoy his life.



This blog is simply a way to share Shane's story as well as new and current information regarding his case. I encourage you to read the posts that describe the details of his case. It is also an opportunity to learn about how flawed the criminal justice system is.

For details of the Shane Watson case, please read the SUMMARY by our investigator, Doug Walters.






Thank you for visiting.

Shane Watson's mailing address:


Mr. Shane Watson

93A 9384

PO Box 8

Otisville, NY 10963



































































Monday, July 14, 2014

Thank You, WBAI-FM

I'm reminded today that we owe a debt of gratitude to the excellent listener-supported radio station WBAI in New York City. In 2003, I happened to be listening to WBAI in my car, while driving in my hometown, White Plains, NY. The late Al Lewis ("Grandpa" from the 1960's sitcom "The Munsters") was speaking about prison reform on his regular Saturday morning program. Mr. Lewis spoke about how so many inmates appreciate hearing from people on the outside, in the form of a simple letter of encouragement, and urged listeners to send in a postcard with one's mailing address in order to be connected with an inmate who wanted to correspond. Several weeks later, I received a postcard with Shane Watson's name and mailing address at Green Haven Correctional Facility, in Stormville, NY.


What are the odds that I would not only be listening to WBAI at that particular moment when Al Lewis encouraged reaching out to someone in prison? And what were the odds that, of all the possible names of inmates I would be given, I was given Shane Watson's name? From this event of synchronicity, randomness, luck, fate, or whatever term one chooses to call it, here we are, over ten years later, on the verge of appealing for a new trial.


I encourage you to listen to WBAI, which has long spoken out for the voiceless.








No comments:

Post a Comment